Transmutation Post Mortem

Last Friday I finished up my final game of the trimester and I am very happy with the results. I worked alongside two of my fellow students to create a game that had three separate player characters that could only be controlled one at a time and was set in a restaurant. Through brainstorming and iteration we finally came to the group of ideas that resulted in Transmutation.

Transmutation is set in the canteen of a nuclear facility that is currently in a meltdown. The player must control three characters and try to survive the onslaught of mutants as they wait for the elevator to reach their floor so they can escape. As each mutant is killed, they leave behind radioactive goop that lights up the otherwise dark room and can/will kill the player characters.

 

The Good

As mentioned, overall I’m happy with what my team and I got done. I thought we worked well as a team for the must part and achieved something we can all be proud of. Personally, I’m also quite happy with myself for stepping up and taking a leadership position on this project.

Multiple times a week I would set up a list of things that needed to be done by the next class and making sure my team was aware of what needed to be done, why and if they had any suggestions to the schedule. With every idea the team collectively came up with, I also made sure that every team member had their input on the idea.

Having someone to keep track of what tasks were done and what needed to be done was potentially part of the reason the team as a whole managed to get so much done. It would have kept things organized and avoided having anybody sit around wondering what to do, or waiting to be told what to do.

In the future, if a team I am apart of seems to be lacking some kind of leadership, I’ll be much more confident when it comes to stepping up if need be and keeping the group organized when it comes to scheduling and milestones which will greatly contribute to the quality of future projects.

 

The Bad

Unfortunately, we made the cut off date to receive assets from our collaborators way too late, and so we didn’t manage to get all of their hard work in time for the deadline, which is very unfair to them.

This was likely because there was a lack of communication in the team regarding the collaborators, which lead to the due dates given to the collaborators not being ideal in terms of content lock before a milestone.

To avoid this in the future I will make sure all collaborator conversations are somewhere where they can be seen by the whole team, such as Slack or Discord, so that any team member who wishes to communicate with them can.

 

Another issue was the lack of updating documentation, in disregarding it for the most part once the team started the project in Unity. Without documentation, we definitely hindered ourselves in regards to how much we could have gotten done.

Looking back, I think the documentation process was rushed. We filled out the HCD, GDD and TDD to a include what we thought we needed at the time and to a level we were happy with, but it was never updated to include things we decided to add after iterating on our design. Once scripting started, by looking at our code its apparent that the TDD was never referred to, which would have contributed to the overall messiness of the code, which made it a lot more inefficient than it could have been, hard to find variables and functions that were needed.

In the future I will personally hold myself accountable to look at the documentation relevant to the tasks I am working on at the time, and constantly remind me team to look at documentation, especially in regards to scripting, to make sure that things are being created as we had already planned them out, which would remove any and all guess work and increase the teams productivity. I will also make sure that relevant documentation is updated as necessary so that any information people need will be in the documentation.

 

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